DIE GEMEINSCHAFT – We’re sowing change.

In our fields, in our kitchen & in our minds.


Eating is a political act. The ways in which we produce food shape how we consume resources and, by extension, preserve the future of our planet. For this reason, we Nobelharts see ourselves not just as chefs and servers, but also as activists for better food. Our concerns are many. First, we hope to show how our experiences in the restaurant world can be scaled for the daily life of normal people. This includes the various culinary actors who interact with food: from private persons, food producers, chefs and vendors to restaurants, institutional cafeterias and kindergartens — any and all promoting a change toward healthier nutrition. The individual motivations here can differ as much as night and day — and still all be good and noble. For one person, it might be a question of good taste, while another is driven by political considerations. These perspectives are then further broken down into the economic, organizational, logistical and expert realms and needs of the various actors.

In an effort to bring all these interest groups together around one table for a mutual exchange, we teamed up with Restaurant Horvath in 2017 to found “Die Gemeinschaft“. It seeks to forge a shared definition of and identification with a new food culture that pays agriculture the societal respect and recognition it deserves. It places a new value on the work of food producers and helps foster a stronger identity, for both producer and the entire production chain, right up to the consumer. We and die Gemeinschaft are interested in a complete cultural paradigm shift away from wrong-minded and subsidy-based agricultural politics and toward a future-minded, diverse farming landscape whose products define a new, better food culture.

We are clearly not alone in these concerns, as seen by the remarkable swell of support and tremendous interest in the Die Gemeinschaft symposium, established in 2018 to run annually at a rural farm. The symposium carves out time and space for actors from all segments of the agricultural value chain to get to know each other outside the pressure of the daily workplace. It has proved a productive platform for interdisciplinary and international brainstorming that helped formulate solution approaches applicable both in business and in our individual daily lives. We see this form of collaboration as a powerful tool for achieving long-term changes to how our society produces food. And it starts with the recognition that every link of the value chain is an essential role in this.

DIE GEMEINSCHAFT – We’re sowing change.

In our fields, in our kitchen & in our minds.


Eating is a political act. The ways in which we produce food shape how we consume resources and, by extension, preserve the future of our planet. For this reason, we Nobelharts see ourselves not just as chefs and servers, but also as activists for better food. Our concerns are many. First, we hope to show how our experiences in the restaurant world can be scaled for the daily life of normal people. This includes the various culinary actors who interact with food: from private persons, food producers, chefs and vendors to restaurants, institutional cafeterias and kindergartens — any and all promoting a change toward healthier nutrition. The individual motivations here can differ as much as night and day — and still all be good and noble. For one person, it might be a question of good taste, while another is driven by political considerations. These perspectives are then further broken down into the economic, organizational, logistical and expert realms and needs of the various actors.

In an effort to bring all these interest groups together around one table for a mutual exchange, we teamed up with Restaurant Horvath in 2017 to found “Die Gemeinschaft“. It seeks to forge a shared definition of and identification with a new food culture that pays agriculture the societal respect and recognition it deserves. It places a new value on the work of food producers and helps foster a stronger identity, for both producer and the entire production chain, right up to the consumer. We and die Gemeinschaft are interested in a complete cultural paradigm shift away from wrong-minded and subsidy-based agricultural politics and toward a future-minded, diverse farming landscape whose products define a new, better food culture.

We are clearly not alone in these concerns, as seen by the remarkable swell of support and tremendous interest in the Die Gemeinschaft symposium, established in 2018 to run annually at a rural farm. The symposium carves out time and space for actors from all segments of the agricultural value chain to get to know each other outside the pressure of the daily workplace. It has proved a productive platform for interdisciplinary and international brainstorming that helped formulate solution approaches applicable both in business and in our individual daily lives. We see this form of collaboration as a powerful tool for achieving long-term changes to how our society produces food. And it starts with the recognition that every link of the value chain is an essential role in this.